Type of Cancer Overview People Who Get It
Bladder Cancer The most common type of bladder cancer is transitional cell carcinoma, also called urothelial carcinoma. Smoking is a major risk factor for bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is often diagnosed at an early stage. Explore the links on this page to learn more about bladder cancer treatment, screening, statistics, research, and clinical trials. Each year in the United States, about 56,000 men and 18,000 women get bladder cancer, and about 12,000 men and 5,000 women die from the disease.
Breast Cancer Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women after skin cancer. Mammograms can detect breast cancer early, possibly before it has spread. Explore the links on this page to learn more about breast cancer prevention, screening, treatment, statistics, research, clinical trials, and more. About 1 in 8 U.S. women (about 12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. In 2020, an estimated 276,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 48,530 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.
Colon and Rectal Cancer Colorectal cancer often begins as a growth called a polyp inside the colon or rectum. Finding and removing polyps can prevent colorectal cancer. Explore the links on this page to learn more about colorectal cancer prevention, screening, treatment, statistics, research, clinical trials, and more. The American Cancer Society's estimates for the number of colorectal cancer cases in the United States for 2020 are: 104,610 new cases of colon cancer. 43,340 new cases of rectal cancer.
Endometrial Cancer Uterine cancers can be of two types: endometrial cancer (common) and uterine sarcoma (rare). Endometrial cancer can often be cured. Uterine sarcoma is often more aggressive and harder to treat. Explore the links on this page to learn more about uterine cancer prevention, screening, treatment, statistics, research, and clinical trials. This year, an estimated 65,620 women in the United States will be diagnosed with uterine, or endometrial, cancer. Uterine cancer is the fourth most common cancer for women in the United States. More than 90% of uterine cancers occur in the endometrium.
Kidney Cancer Kidney cancer can develop in adults and children. The main types of kidney cancer are renal cell cancer, transitional cell cancer, and Wilms tumor. Certain inherited conditions increase the risk of kidney cancer. Explore the links on this page to learn more about kidney cancer treatment, statistics, research, and clinical trials. This year, an estimated 73,750 adults (45,520 men and 28,230 women) in the United States will be diagnosed with kidney cancer. Kidney cancer is the sixth most common cancer for men, and it is the eighth most common cancer for women.
Leukemia Leukemia is a broad term for cancers of the blood cells. The type of leukemia depends on the type of blood cell that becomes cancer and whether it grows quickly or slowly. Leukemia occurs most often in adults older than 55, but it is also the most common cancer in children younger than 15. Explore the links on this page to learn more about the types of leukemia plus treatment, statistics, research, and clinical trials. Leukemia is diagnosed 10 times more often in adults than children. 60,300 people are expected to be diagnosed with leukemia this year. Over 382,000 people are living with leukemia, or are in remission. Every day 170 Americans are diagnosed with leukemia and 67 lose the fight.
Liver Liver cancer includes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma). Risk factors for HCC include chronic infection with hepatitis B or C and cirrhosis of the liver. Explore the links on this page to learn more about liver cancer treatment, prevention, screening, statistics, research, and clinical trials. Each year in the United States, about 33,000 people get liver cancer, and about 27,000 people die from the disease.
Lung Cancer Lung cancer includes two main types: non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer. Smoking causes most lung cancers, but nonsmokers can also develop lung cancer. Explore the links on this page to learn more about lung cancer treatment, prevention, screening, statistics, research, clinical trials, and more. One in 16 people in the US will be diagnosed with lung cancer in their lifetime. More than 228,000 people in the US will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year, with a new diagnosis every 2.3 minutes.
Melanoma Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. The main types of skin cancer are squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Melanoma is much less common than the other types but much more likely to invade nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Most deaths from skin cancer are caused by melanoma. Explore the links on this page to learn more about skin cancer prevention, screening, treatment, statistics, research, clinical trials, and more. This year an estimated 100,350 adults (60,190 men and 40,160 women) in the United States will be diagnosed with invasive melanoma of the skin. Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer among men and the sixth most common cancer among women. Melanoma is 20 times more common in white people than in Black people.
Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Lymphoma is a broad term for cancer that begins in cells of the lymph system. The two main types are Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Hodgkin lymphoma can often be cured. The prognosis of NHL depends on the specific type. Explore the links on this page to learn more about lymphoma treatment, research, and clinical trials. The American Cancer Society's estimates for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2020 are: About 77,240 people (42,380 males and 34,860 females) will be diagnosed with NHL.
Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic cancer can develop from two kinds of cells in the pancreas: exocrine cells and neuroendocrine cells, such as islet cells. The exocrine type is more common and is usually found at an advanced stage. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (islet cell tumors) are less common but have a better prognosis. Explore the links on this page to learn more about pancreatic cancer treatment, statistics, research, and clinical trials. The American Cancer Society's estimates for pancreatic cancer in the United States for 2020 are: About 57,600 people (30,400 men and 27,200 women) will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. About 47,050 people (24,640 men and 22,410 women) will die of pancreatic cancer.
Prostate Cancer Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Prostate cancer usually grows very slowly, and finding and treating it before symptoms occur may not improve men's health or help them live longer. Explore the links on this page to learn about prostate cancer treatment, prevention, screening, statistics, research, and more. About 1 man in 9 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. Prostate cancer is more likely to develop in older men and in African-American men. About 6 cases in 10 are diagnosed in men who are 65 or older, and it is rare in men under 40. The average age at diagnosis is about 66.
Thyroid Cancer There are four main types of thyroid cancer. These are papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary is the most common type. The four types differ in how aggressive they are. Thyroid cancer that is found at an early stage can often be treated successfully. Explore the links on this page to learn more about thyroid cancer treatment, screening, statistics, research, and clinical trials. When cancer starts in the thyroid gland, it is called thyroid cancer. Every year, about 12,000 men and 35,000 women get thyroid cancer, and more than 900 men and 1,100 women die from the disease.